Woodland indians

Woodland Indians in Virginia the invention of pottery enabled better food storage, but heavy pots made sense only in a society that occupied one place for long periods of time Source: Native Americans responded by changing their technology for hunting, placing smaller points on their spears and hunting smaller game as the large mammals disappeared and deciduous forest expanded to cover Virginia. That shift in Native American culture is defined today by archeologists as the shift from Paleo-Indian to Archaic.

Woodland indians

Gale Woodland indians of U.

Woodland indians

A majority of Eastern Woodlands tribes spoke Iroquoian or Algonquian. The Iroquoian tribes were primarily deer hunters but they also grew corn, squash, and beans, they gathered nuts and berries, and they fished.

The Algonquian tribes also cultivated corn, beans, and squash. While the northerly tribes relied more heavily on hunting, the tribes that settled in the fertile region of the Ohio River Valley and southward through the Mississippi Delta the Cherokee, Choctaw, Natchez, and Seminole developed a farming and trading economy.

These groups were also Mound Builders —they erected huge earthworks as burial grounds. The Eastern Woodlands Indians traveled on foot and in birch-bark canoes. In the north, they wore deerskin clothing and they painted their faces and bodies.

In the southern region, they wore little clothing and they often tattooed their bodies. The Eastern Woodlands Indians of the north lived predominately in dome-shaped wigwams arched shelters made of a framework of poles and covered with bark, rush mats, or hides and in long houses multi-family lodges having pole frames and covered with elm shingles.

The tribes in the south lived in wattle and daub houses wooden framed houses covered with reed mats and plaster. The Eastern Woodlands Indians built walls and fences around villages for protection.

Woodland indians

Warfare sometimes broke out among the tribes. The Indians used bows and arrows as well as clubs to defend themselves and their lands. The Eastern Woodlands tribes that lived along the Atlantic Coast were the first native Americans that had contact with Europeans. Friendships were made; alliances forged; land deals struck; and treaties signed.

But as settlers in increasing numbers encroached on tribal lands, conflicts arose.

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These conflicts were between white settlers and the Indians and between Indians and other Indians, as native inhabitants took sides in the conflicts. The Huron and some Algonquian groups allied themselves with the French. When the American colonies waged a battle for freedom from Great Britainthe American Revolution —83 divided the tribes of the Iroquois League.

All but the Oneida allied themselves with the British. In the s many Eastern Woodlands tribes were forced off their native lands by the U.The Early Woodland subperiod, – B.C., is marked by a continuation of many of the innovations that began during the preceding Late Archaic.

Woodland Indians About North Georgia. Definitions The term Woodland Indians was created in to describe a prehistoric culture that was significantly different than the nomadic Archaic Indians that roamed the eastern third of the North American Continent from B.

C. to about B. C. The Woodland Indians are the third major prehistoric culture to live in Tennessee.

Woodland-period-overview

The first was the Paleo-Indians, who were nomads, and the second were the Archaic Indians. Woodland Indians About North Georgia. Definitions The term Woodland Indians was created in to describe a prehistoric culture that was significantly different than the nomadic Archaic Indians that roamed the eastern third of the North American Continent from B.

C. to about B. C. THE PLYMOUTH THANKSGIVING STORY When the Pilgrims crossed the Atlantic Ocean in , they landed on the rocky shores of a territory that was inhabited by the Wampanoag (Wam pa NO ag) Indians.

Southwest Ontario, Southern Ontario (excluding the very south that was occupied by the Eastern Woodland Farmers), Southern Quebec and the Maritime Provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island).

The Eastern Woodland Indians - Their life and culture